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Purpose of this blog

This site is managed by the Digital Inclusion Alliance Aotearoa (DIAA) and is intended for partner organisations delivering programmes endorsed and/or supported by DIAA.  Currently this includes the following programmes:

  • Stepping UP
  • JUMP
  • DORA
  • Better Digital Futures for Seniors
  • Appy Seniors
  • Digital Wellbeing for All

The blog aims to address mainly operational issues associated with the delivery of these digital inclusion programmes.  It provides a repository of information dealing with specific questions raised by programme delivery partners.

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Faulty Jump modems during lockdown

During lockdown, we are couriering replacement modems from our Wellington base together with a courier bag for the return of the faulty unit.

The process works like this: the Jump customer contacts the Skinny Care Team on 0800 475 4669 if they have a suspected problem with their modem. The Care Team may be able resolve this remotely, but if they can’t they will refer the customer to our (DIAA) 0800 number (0800 463 422) for Shelley to arrange a replacement.

Shelley takes on the role that Jump partners would normally provide, getting details of the modem (IMEI Number), customer’s name and physical address. She then completes the online Modem Return form to ensure the old modem is delinked from the customer’s account and arranges for a new modem to be sent.

By the time the modem arrives (typically within 2-3 working days), the Skinny Support Team will have actioned the de-linking request and the customer can proceed to set up a new account.

If the customer has a credit balance on their old account, they must contact the Skinny Care team again, after they have their new modem and new Skinny account set up, to arrange for the credit balance to be transferred.

If a customer contacts you, as a Jump partner, directly rather than contacting the Skinny Care Team you are welcome to follow the same steps as
Shelley, i.e. capture the contact details for the customer and the IMEI number of the faulty modem, email these to jump@diaa.nz, and complete a Modem Return Form.

Surge in demand for internet could result in more ‘no-availability’ address checks

With the move to Level 4 lockdown, internet service providers have noticed a surge in internet usage. This is not really that surprising, but with the increased loading on the 4G wireless network, this could result in partners having to decline applications from more customers. We hope this is just a temporary issue and that the loading on the network will reduce when we move out of Level 4 lockdown.

All partners should now have supplies of the flyer explaining why some households can not be connected even when others in their neighbourhood can; if you haven’t received any of these flyers please contact us at jump@diaa.nz and we can send you some.

Possible problem using the Jump online order form

One of our partners alerted us to a problem she was having with our Jump online order form; I alluded to this in a previous post, but have now had the opportunity to investigate further.

As I suspected this is a case of Google trying to be helpful, but not for the reason I thought. This is a new feature Google introduced into their forms from 3 August 2021, so this is the first time we have noticed this.

If you are signed into a Google account when you access our Jump application form the form will automatically add in your email address and start automatically saving your responses as a draft for 30 days. You can find more information about this feature here. The purpose of this is that you can return to the form anytime within 30 days to complete the form without having to repeat information that you have already entered.

This is not a feature that is required for our form and, as the form owner, we are supposed to be able to turn this feature off. But I have checked this out and we don’t have the option, possible because the form was created before 3 August 2021. Maybe a bit more googling will find a workaround.

But in the meantime, I think we will just have to live with it. The concern expressed by our partner was that her personal email address would somehow be included in the form responses and shared with the family requesting the Jump modem (who do get a copy of the application form when completed).

We have no evidence that this is happening; the feature appears limited to saving a draft of the form in the identified google account. However if you have any concerns about this please use a different browser, one that is not linked to your google account, or open an incognito window (ctl+shift+n).

Modems couriered every weekday during lockdowns

One of our Jump partners asked whether we are able to courier modems during the Level 4 lockdown, or whether we had to wait until we move to a lower level. The answer is a definite YES. We (DIAA) are recognised as an essential service provider during Covid lockdowns, as is anyone supplying Jump modems, and we can all continue to operate. Since the latest Covid-19 lockdown was announced on Tuesday 17 August, we have continued to courier modems ordered through our online ‘self-service’ application form.

One partner has reported a problem using our online form where Google was trying to be helpful and auto-filled the form with her details rather than the customer. If I have this right, this can only happen if you enter your own email address in the form – this field is not intended to be the Jump partner’s email but the email of the customer applying for service. If you do get some unwanted auto-filling, try refreshing your browser to get a blank form.

A copy of the form is then sent to this email (for the customer to verify that the details are correct) as well as to us to arrange for a modem to be sent. The modem will be couriered by mid-day on the next workday and should generally arrive the following day.

Our courier partner (NZ Post) has advised that there could be some delays as a result of the surge in the volumes of courier packages during Covid lockdowns; we found that this was the case in the main centres during the 2020 lockdowns, especially Auckland and Wellington.

Jump Modems still available during Covid lockdown

With the country returning to a Level 4 lockdown today, all Jump partners will have to suspend the delivery of Jump modems to their communities. However the online ‘self-service’ option remains available. This involves completing an online application form that can be found here. You can also find this form on our Stepping Up website – go to ‘Jump’ in the top menu bar and select ‘Get Jump’; scroll to the bottom of the page and you will find a link to the self-service form.

We hope that most partners will be able to continue supporting their communities by accepting applications by telephone and submitting the application form on behalf of their customers. This worked really well during the Level 4 lockdowns in 2020 and as a result, thousands of households were able to connect to the internet at a time when their physical movements were severely constrained.

We acknowledge this is not as good an option as face-to-face delivery, where you can help your customers set up their Skinny accounts, but it can still be a lifeline for households without the internet.

Are you having problems signing customers up with the Jump app?

Some partners have experienced problems signing up their customers with the Jump app and the Skinny team has asked us to inform them of any issues in case there are things that can be fixed in the back end. With so many varieties of smartphones and operating systems it is impossible for any app to cover all models. Most app developers do try to ensure that their apps are compatible with older models, but there is a limit. I have just tried by old iPhone 5 and when I try to download the Jump app it says: “requires IoS 14.0 or later”. When I google to find out what IoS is on my phone, I discover:

Will my iPhone 5 still work in 2021? No, absolutely not. The phone you’re talking about came out in 2013. Sure, Apple’s known for longevity, but the iPhone 5S is over seven years old! Not only would it run really slow, but the maximum iOS version that can run on it is iOS 12!

So the moral of the story is that if your customers have phones that are over 7 years old, then the Jump app probably won’t work.

But not to be deterred, the Skinny Team has encouraged us to report any problems when attempting to use the Jump app. In order to help, they really need the following details:

Jump app ‘how to’ video now live

The Spark Foundation has prepared a 6 minute video explaining the setup process using the Skinny Jump app. We strongly encourage all partners delivering Jump modems to view this video and have it on hand when you are helping your customers. The video is currently only available in English, but Te Reo Māori and Samoan versions are on their way.

Our survey data indicates that 57% of all Jump sign-ups during the last month were done using the app. We think the app makes things much easier for Jump users, especially when it comes to topping up and buying data, so we are wondering why 43% are not using the app.

Feedback from users indicated that most partners are explaining the app but many are still choosing to still use a computer to complete the signup process. We can understand why this makes sense when you are trying to share a screen with your customers and explain the signup process, but we do encourage you to go through the app sign up as well (assuming of course that your customers have a smartphone). Jump users will not be able to use the app unless they have signed up using the app. The good news is that users can sign up using both a web browser and the app (using the same email address) and this then gives them the choice of both.

Green light on Jump modems

I have just received the green light to say that the troublesome modems that had not been provisioned for Skinny Jump should be alright to issue now. The only problems could be with any modems from the batch that were actually issued. The Skinny team is trying to identify any, but partners may also be aware of these. The problem is that the whole batch was reset and this could cause problems for any modems already in use. This will probably mean they have to start the registration process again.

The Skinny team has asked me to pass on their apologies for this disruption – they are just as keen as we are to try and prevent his happening again.

Can you issue more than one Jump modem to a household?

A message from one of our Jump partners today:

I had a lady come in wanting a Skinny Jump this morning. I asked whether there was broadband at the property and she said no, so I proceeded to check her address with the Skinny Jump address checker. It said it was unavailable and when I explained this she said that she knew coverage was available there because there was already a Jump modem. I asked why she was wanting another Skinny Jump modem if there was already one there and she said that it was for one person and they weren’t going to top up for others. She then asked me to check other addresses – which returned the same ‘no availability’ result, so I wasn’t able to proceed, but she said she would return again. Wasn’t happy she couldn’t get a modem today and was starting to become slightly argumentative. Is it reasonable for there to be more than one Skinny Jump modem at a property? Is this going against the spirit of the programme? Just thought I should get the official party line on this.

Two issues here – ‘no coverage’ and ‘more than one Jump modem at the same address’. These are issues many partners encounter.

(1) Skinny address checker indicates ‘no coverage’ but customers insist it works for their neighbours, or in the case above, at the same address. All partners will soon be receiving a pack of ‘no coverage’ explanatory flyers to give to customers who don’t understand the limitations of wireless connections (and that is pretty much everyone except radio engineers!). We also encourage someone from every Jump partner to attend one of the two special webinars next week (on 2 and 6 August, where this issue is being discussed by the Spark Foundation team. You can register here: https://diaa.arlo.co/w/upcoming/cat-11-partner-webinars/

(2) More than one modem at the same address: while the goal for Skinny Jump is to provide internet connectivity for households that can’t afford a fixed line connection, we do recognise that many houses often have more than one family or people who live quite independently of each other, e.g. a landlord and tenant. There are also many situations where people are living in flats, motels, camping grounds, etc. that share the same physical address. So sharing the same address is not enough to disqualify an applicant. There is no technical reason why two or more modems cannot be located at the same address (although when it gets to seven, as has happened, we do investigate to find out the reason). Partners have the discretion to refuse a customer if you suspect someone is abusing the opportunity, but you can supply more than one modem to the same address if you believe the reasons are genuine.