You should never run out of Jump modems but if you do….

We continue to receive requests from partners for more modems and that is fine – remember to use the following email: jump@diaa.nz . But every time we do get a request we ask ourselves why? We have this very efficient system that alerts us when a partner is running low on modems. Each partner has a trigger level that determines when new modems are sent. To make sure you never run out, we set the trigger level to the number of modems that you are typically issuing each week – this means we have a week to get new supplies to you. We know this isn’t perfect and are always happy to receive your individual requests.

The trigger level is set in cell G2 of your Jump register; we remind you what this is every time we ship modems, so do check the next box that arrives. Or if you would like access to your Jump register, please let us know (jump@diaa.nz); this does need to be a gmail address, or an email linked to a gmail address. Many of our partners set up a generic gmail for this purpose that can be used by all staff supporting the Jump programme.

We almost always find though that when we receive an email request it is because some other element of our tracking process is not working. The most common causes are:

Modems have been issued but Jump Profile Forms have not been completed. We totally rely on a form being completed for every modem issued; this allows us to mark up your Jump register, which in turn decreases your stock levels by one. If the form is not completed, we have no way of knowing that the modem has been issued. This generally results in us asking partners to do a stocktake and advise us of the IMEI numbers of the modems they are holding; we can then mark out the others in the Jump register to get things back on track.

There is an unexpected surge in demand for Jump modems. We update the Jump registers every day, but if a partner is holding 6 modems with a trigger level set at 5 and then issues 5 modems in one day, there will be a delay of a few days in getting new supplies. The solution in this case is to increase the trigger level or if partners are able to anticipate the surge, we can help you stock up in advance.

A box of modems has been misplaced. We understand that our partners lead busy lives and often many people are involved in supporting the Jump programme. It is easy for a box to be misplaced – under someone’s desk or in a storeroom. We have records of all modems dispatched, including the courier track and trace details. This includes the name of the person signing for the box of modems when it arrives. We often discover this person is on leave and no-one else knows where the box has been stored. The Jump registers include details of all modem shipments, including the Post Haste tracker code, so it is easy for us or for partners to quickly confirm whether this is a courier issue or a local one.

Modems appear to be faulty during the set up process and are not recorded. It is easy to make mistakes when helping a customer set up their modems and their Skinny accounts and, at times, the most pragmatic thing to do is simply move on to another modem. But is is important to contact the Skinny support team by email (support-team@skinny.co.nz) and make sure the modem is delinked and reset, ready for issue to another customer. If the modem is genuinely faulty and has not been allocated, partners should indicate this by entering ‘faulty’ in column B of the Jump register. This then reduces your stock count by one, as the modem is not available for re-issue. Or if you don’t want to mark up the Register, you can always send us an email with the IMEI number (jump@diaa.nz) and we’ll mark it up for you.

Jump Demo Modems

We encourage all our partners to hold a ‘demo’ modem. This is useful for training new staff as well as explaining to customers what the different lights mean. You can also explain to customers how to connect their digital devices to the modem using WiFi when they get home and power up their Jump modems.

The modems do come with a lot of different codes and numbers on the stickers, so it is good to point out the WiFi Password, which could be on a sticker on the back of the modem or or the bottom. Some customers do get confused by the ‘Admin’ password and try to use this for their WiFi link, so it is good to highlight this during the setup process.

Note WiFi Password is called ‘Password’ on this sticker (not to be confused with ‘Admin’ Password)
Note WiFi Password is called WiFi Key on this sticker

When you power up the Demo modem, it will connect to the Jump network and the clock starts ticking on your initial 30 days 5GB that is pre-loaded. You do not need to top up your account when the initial 30GB expires, but if you wish to use the modem for other purposes, then it is fine to keep topping it up.

Even after the initial 30GB has expired, the Demo modem continues to be useful to explain the various features and the WiFi password.

Are you confused about de-linking Jump modems?

Some partners are still uncertain about the process for de-linking Jump modems.

When does a modem need to be de-linked?

There are three particular situations when a Jump modem needs to be de-linked from a customer’s Skinny account:

(1) A faulty modem is returned to a partner and a replacement modem is issued. Customers should contact the Skinny Helpdesk whenever they have a faulty modem and if the fault cannot be fixed, the Skinny Care Team will ask the customer to return the modem to a nearby partner and get a replacement. At the same time the Skinny Care Team will issue a request to the Skinny Support Team to de-link the modem from the customer’s Skinny account. If the modem is not de-linked, the customer will not be able to use any credit remaining on their Skinny account; they would have to set up a new Skinny account with a different email address and would lose any balance on their old account. This will become obvious to partners when trying to set up the replacement modem. To get the modem de-linked, partners must email the Skinny Support Team on: support-team@skinny.co.nz . Customers must also call the Help desk (Care Team) to get their replacement modem linked to their existing account.

NOTE the difference between the Skinny Care Team and Skinny Support Team. The Care Team is contacted by telephone (0800 475 4669) and the Support Team by email only support-team@skinny.co.nz . The Care Team is not authorised to de-link accounts; all requests for de-linking are handled by the Support Team.

(2) An error is made during the setup process and the modem needs to be re-set before it can be re-issued. Partners should email the Skinny Support Team support-team@skinny.co.nz and ask for the modem to be de-linked and reset.

(3) A modem is returned in good condition by a customer who does not want it anymore. Since February 2020, our advice has been to put all returned modems (faulty or otherwise) in a recycling box. However, some partners have continued with the previous process, which was to contact the Skinny Support Team support-team@skinny.co.nz and ask for the modem to be de-linked from the previous customer’s account and reset for re-issue ($5/30GB preloaded). We expect to return to this process in 2021, so if this is already working for you, keep on trucking!

Faulty & Returned Modems

B315
B315 Skinny Jump modem

Partners are reminded that all returned B315 Skinny Jump modems – whether these are faulty or are simply not required any more – are to be withdrawn from circulation and added to a recycling box.  When you have five or six modems (whatever fits in the box), you should email us (jump@diaa.nz) with the IMEI numbers of the withdrawn modems and we will send you a courier sticker and address label for an approved recycler. We have been advised by the Spark Foundation that the effort involved in trying to repair and reset these modems is simply not justified and that replacement modems should be supplied, if required.  Partners must ensure that a new Stepping UP Profile form is completed if a replacement modem is issued.

B618
B618 Skinny Jump modem

However, should a customer return a B618 modem, these are to be returned for repair and re-use.  Customers should not be returning these to you, but it appears that some do.  The only people receiving B618 modems at this stage are families with school children, who have been identified as part of the Covid-19 response by their school or the Ministry of Education as households without broadband internet. If their modem is faulty or no longer required they must contact the Skinny Helpdesk on 0800 475 4669 in the first instance.  A return courier bag will then be sent directly to them.

Partners who do end up with a B618 modem should follow the same procedure – report the returned modem to the Skinny Helpdesk and this will result in a return courier bag being sent to you.

 

Can a Jump modem be linked to an existing Skinny Phone account?

Partners who have been around a while will recall that once upon a time it was possible for an existing Skinny phone customer to log into their account and ‘add’ the Jump modem, so that they could use the same email and password to log in to their Jump account as their phone account.  This made good sense to everyone.

However on 25 March 2020, when Jump 2.0 was launched, this feature was removed.  No-one quite knows why, but this appears to have been an unintended casualty of other improvements.

The bottom line now is that it is simply not possible to ‘add’ a Skinny Jump modem to an existing Skinny phone customer’s account.  The customer must use two different emails for the two services.  How dumb is that, I hear you say (and some have already said), and we agree and so do our friends at the Spark Foundation.

This has been formally raised with the Skinny technical team and they have agreed to review this.  That’s the good news.  Today we learnt that this mightn’t happen until the end of 2020.  So there’s nothing you or we can do in the meantime.  Just grin and bear it and think nice thoughts about all the good things that Jump does provide.

 

 

Jump Modems – Delivery Options

I am getting frequent questions about whether the home delivery self-service option is still available for Skinny Jump.  The short answer is “yes”, but please read on so that I can explain the ‘but‘.

All Jump inquiries are directed to a delivery partner organisation and our preference (from both a support and financial perspective) is for people to front up to a local partner.  There are now 196 publicly listed locations where people can go to get a Skinny Jump modem and new locations are being added every week.

The advantages are manifold:

(1) Partners are able more easily to assess the eligibility of the applicants;

(2) Partners are able to assist applicants set up their Skinny accounts, making sure they have a working email (and one they can remember the password for!);

(3) Partners are able to explain what customers can do with 30GB data and how they are limited to five plan renewals (total of 150GB) a month;

(4) Partners are able to explain the top up/ plan renewal process, so that customers feel confident about doing this when their first month’s internet expires;

(5) Partners are welcome to engage interpreters for customers who have English as a second language, and claim back costs from DIAA;

(6) Partners are able to offer opportunities for new internet users to participate in scheduled Stepping UP or Better Digital Futures digital literacy classes;

(7) Partners are able to develop a relationship with the customer, so that they are encouraged to return for other library services.

BUT, if for any reason the customer finds it difficult to get to a Jump partner, e.g. they could live a long way away or may have physical disabilities that prevent them from travelling, partners are welcome to use the online application form.  Note that the Application Form has been amended to require the name of the person making the referral and their organisation.  Applicants must also give a reason why they can’t visit a Jump partner.

Post Haste branch contacts

All Jump modems are sent by Post Haste.  For rural communities, Post Haste hands over the final delivery stage to a partner courier company, Coural. For deliveries in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch, the unprecedented demand for courier services during the last two months  has meant that deliveries are frequently delayed.  At times the package appears to delayed in one of the main centre depots; this was particularly bad during the Level 4 and Level 3 Covid-19 lockdown periods, when most businesses were not operating and the couriers were unable to move packages through their depots.  This resulted in huge congestion and at times Jump modems seemed to literally get buried in the depots.

If the courier tracker reveals this to be case, we advise customers (or Jump delivery partners) to follow up directly with their nearest Post Haste courier branch.  Contact details are in the table below:

Auckland 161 Station Road, Penrose 09 525 4060
Auckland North Harbour 1 Rothwell Avenue, North Harbour 09 525 2060
Blenheim 43 Grove Road, Blenheim 03 520 8430
Christchurch (includes West Coast) 20 Syd Bradley Road, Dakota Park, Christchurch 03 345 6830
Dunedin 35 Portsmouth Drive, Dunedin 03 477 7238
Hamilton 32-36 Gallagher Drive, Hamilton 07 843 0755
Hawkes Bay (Includes Gisborne) 22 Wakefield Street, Napier 06 843 9493
Invercargill / Queenstown 195 Bond Street, Invercargill 03 214 4242
Nelson Unit 7, 74 Quarantine Road, Nelson 03 545 6779
New Plymouth Unit 3, 674 Devon Road, New Plymouth 06 769 6545
Palmerston North 12-22 Cook Street, Palmerston North 06 356 5337
Rotorua (includes Taupo) 105 Biak Street, Rotorua 07 348 5666
Tauranga 34 Hull Road, Mount Maunganui 07 571 5601
Timaru 139-141 Hilton Highway, Timaru 03 687 4276
Wellington (incudes Wairarapa) 9 Glover Street, Ngauranga, Wellington 04 472 3666
Whangarei 11 Dyer Street, Whangarei 09 430 2396

Track & Trace for Jump modems

After couriering 3500 Jump modems and experiencing significant courier delays, we grew to the realisation that there must be a better way to inform customers about delivery progress.  I realise many of you, as our delivery partners, have been at the front end of this.  Having helped people connect to Jump, the next natural question people have had has been: “when will my modem arrive?”, or even “has my application been approved?”.

Everyone does get an email copy of their application form which advises them that it could take a week to get the modem to them, but inevitably people do want to make sure their application has not been overlooked.

So we have signed up for eTXT, a service provided by Spark, to provide all applicants with a text message, including a link to the Post Haste tracker for their modem.  The text will be sent when the modem is collected by the courier, which is generally around mid-day the day after the application has been submitted.

Normal courier times are overnight within the North Island and 2 days to the South Island, and for rural deliveries another day or so.  But these have not been normal times, and congestion in the courier world means that it has been taking much longer.  At times the modem gets as far as the recipient’s home but for some reason the courier is unable to locate the person the package is for and so it is returned to the local courier depot.

By giving applicants access to the courier tracker, they can monitor the journey of their modem themselves and if they find out it is held up in their local courier branch, they can contact them directly to arrange delivery.

We should have done this 8 weeks ago, but this has been a learning journey for us as well.  And it is certainly not too late, as our home deliveries for Jump modems are continuing at around 40 a day.

We expect this to be operational from Tuesday’s courier run (2 June 2020).  For those who don’t receive a text confirmation that a modem is on the way within a few days of their application, this probably means that there has been an issue with the address details or Skinny coverage.  In this case, we contact all families by phone, text or email to get the missing information or explain why we haven’t sent a modem.

So if partners do get any queries about modem deliveries please ask your customers to contact Shelley on 0800 463 422 and she will follow this up.  Please do not contact the Skinny Helpdesk with any issues about modem deliveries – they do not have access to this information.  They take over once the modem arrives and provide assistance as required in setting up Skinny accounts and providing any technical support.

Invercargill onto it!

Lindsay King, the Learning Connections Coordinator at Invercargill City Libraries, and local coordinator for Skinny Jump, is the first Jump partner since the Covid-19 lockdown ended to request a courier sticker and address label to send faulty and returned modems for recycling.  So I thought it might be timely to remind everyone of the process for handling returned and faulty Jump modems.

You may recall my earlier post about returning faulty modems. During the last 2 months, we have issued over 3500 Jump modems through our home-delivery process.  Not surprisingly, around 4% of these (140) have been identified as ‘faulty’ when customers have reported problems to the Skinny Helpdesk and we have couriered a replacement modem.   We included a note with the replacement modem, asking the customer to return the faulty modem to their nearest Jump partner after the Covid-19 lockdown ended.

Now that most partners have their doors open again, I am expecting the people holding faulty modems to return them to you.  Please just assign them to your faulty/returns modem box and when you have a box full (5 or 6 modems) please contact us at jump@diaa.nz  to get a courier sticker and return address label.  Please advise the IMEI numbers of the modems you are sending for recycling, so that we can update our records.

Note that this applies to all returned modems; we no longer require you to contact the Skinny Helpdesk to request de-linking, so that the modem can be re-issued.

You are also welcome to send modems directly to the recycler if you prefer, but can you please advise us the IMEI numbers of the modems when you do this.  Thank you.

The recycler is:

Sims E-Cycling (NZ) Ltd, 69 Aintree Avenue, Mangere, AUCKLAND Attention: Robert Herbert Phone: 09 275 1501

 

What happened to the Jump Participant GDoc Registers?

Things changed on 25 March (not just the Covid-19 lockdown!) with the expansion of the criteria for Jump.  When we introduced the home-delivery option (that has now reached nearly 4000 people), we abandoned the Kawa of Care form that we used to update the Jump registers in GDocs and replaced this with a Stepping UP Profile form which is to be used by partners when issuing Jump modems.  We also plan to progressively use this for other DIAA digital inclusion programmes, to create a more comprehensive picture of the people who are participating.

For the home-delivery Jump option, we created a new form (Skinny Jump Application Form), based on the Stepping UP profile form, but with some additional contact information, such as a physical address so that we can check Skinny Jump coverage and courier modems to applicants.

For modems issued by partners, we are continuing to update the individual partner Jump register GDocs, using information captured in the Stepping UP profile form, but we are only including name and date information (linked to IMEI and BB numbers).  The remaining data is consolidated in a national database where we can analyse the profile of people participating.  The advice we received from privacy lawyers was that we were exposing ourselves and our partners to possible privacy breaches by recording participant details in a GDoc that could be easily shared and copied.

Our main reason for maintaining the individual partner GDocs is for stock control purposes, so that we can re-issue modems as required. Partners are welcome to continue to have access to this if they find it helpful.